Yellow Month: All You Need To Know About Neonatal Jaundice Including Things You Should Do When Your Baby Becomes Yellow. | FUN, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Yellow Month: All You Need To Know About Neonatal Jaundice Including Things You Should Do When Your Baby Becomes Yellow.

 

Yellow Month: All You Need To Know About Neonatal Jaundice Including Things You Should Do When Your Baby Becomes Yellow.

Neonatal Jaundice or neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is one of the common causes of hospital admission among babies. The month of May has been designated as Yellow month to create awareness on the condition, jaundice, and educate the public on it. 


What Is Neonatal Jaundice


Neonatal Jaundice is the yellowish color seen on a baby's skin, eyes, and mouth as a result of excess bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a product that is formed from the breakdown of hemoglobin and is excreted by the liver. Types of Neonatal Jaundice


1. Physiological Jaundice: When the baby is in the womb, a lot of red blood cells are produced to aid in the transport of oxygen and nutrients to body tissues and organs. After delivery, the baby begins to adjust to the extrauterine life by destroying excess red blood cells leading to the release of excess bilirubin. Since the baby's liver is limited in excretion, bilirubin builds up in the blood resulting in jaundice. This type of jaundice is normal and dissipates on its own. 


2. Breastfeeding Jaundice: When mothers fail to meet the right amounts of breast milk required by babies, it may lead to jaundice.


3. Pathologic Jaundice: This means that there's an underlying condition that is causing the baby to be jaundiced. Conditions such as infection, excessive red blood cells, hemolytic disease, impaired liver function, and many more.


Causes of Neonatal Jaundice


1. Prematurity


2. Cold stress


3. Mother and baby blood incompatibility


4. Inadequate breastfeeding


5. Infection


6. Polycythemia


7. Liver problems


Treatment of Neonatal Jaundice


Not all neonatal jaundice require hospital admission but when you spot the yellow pigmentation in your baby's skin or eyes, you should report to the nearest hospital. The doctor will perform a test to see if your baby's jaundice requires breast milk as treatment or phototherapy which involves putting the baby under blue light with the eyes covered in a blindfold.


Complications


1. Seizures


2. Kernicterus which is brain damage due to excess bilirubin in the blood.


To avoid these complications, mothers should monitor their babies closely and report early at the nearby hospital for treatment and also continue to breastfeed the baby frequently and on-demand.

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